• PedalPure: turning livelihoods into water solutions in Bangladesh

    Rickshaw driver drinking water.
    Posted 24 Oct 2016 by Rebecca Heald

    In an innovative new scheme in Dhaka, Bangladesh is turning pedal power into clean water for rickshaw pullers and their families. Watch the film to find out how.  In Bangladesh about 2.25 million people live in slum areas in extreme poverty, half of them in the capital, Dhaka. Most of the city’s 600,000 rickshaw pullers live in its slums. Many of them earn less than £4 per day, and support six to eight family members. Every year thousands of children living in the slum communi...

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  • WaterAid and knowledge management: admitting success

    Learning hub portrait
    Posted 17 Oct 2016 by Aditi Chandak, Pete Cranston

    Guest author Pete Cranston and Aditi Chandak, WaterAid’s Learning and Knowledge Advisor, explain how we created positive conversations when reviewing our practice around learning and knowledge management.

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  • My eulogy to the Australian African Community Engagement Scheme and why its spirit should live on

    Men in Luwera village, Malawi dig a trench for the water supply scheme.
    Posted 23 Aug 2016 by Rosie Wheen

    The AACES was a five-year programme that focused on empowering women, young people, children, people with disabilities and others in 11 countries. Rosie Wheen, Head of International Programmes at WaterAid Australia, reflects on five factors that made AACES such a success, and what the sector can take away to help its spirit live on.

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  • Learning from Tanzanian innovators

    Mattius Millinga, 51-years-old, stands next to one of the 'pajaj' vehicles that transports the gulper pump equipment, outside his house in Kigamboni Ward, Temeke Municipality, Dar es Salaam City, Tanzania - February 2015.
    Posted 22 Mar 2016 by Rémi Kaupp

    Rémi Kaupp, Urban Sanitation Specialist at WaterAid UK, analyses the success of two Tanzanian entrepreneurs who are changing the way sanitation works in Dar es Salaam.

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  • Promoting innovative WASH solutions in Ghana

    Posted 12 Feb 2016 by Yvonne Kafui Nyaku

    Around 85% of Ghanaians do not have access to a basic toilet, but an innovative project initiated by WaterAid Ghana could help light the way.

    Yvonne Kafui Nyaku, Communications and Campaigns Officer at WaterAid Ghana, looks at how a Total Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) intervention could solve WASH problems while providing energy in a Ghanaian boarding school.

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  • Realising Nigeria’s sanitation dreams

    A man with an affordable latrine.
    Posted 3 Dec 2015 by Erin Flynn

    Nigeria is one of the world’s five biggest contributors to the problem of open defecation, despite ongoing Government efforts. Erin Flynn, WaterAid’s Research Manager, looks at the country’s sanitation problem and whether the sanitation ladder will help Nigeria reach its ambitious targets.

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  • Does the WASH sector need innovation?

    Julius Chisengo and Cleophas Shinga empty the contents of a pit latrine at Kigamboni Ward, Temeke Municipality, Dar es Salaam City, Tanzania.
    Posted 16 Nov 2015 by Rémi Kaupp

    Innovation is often heralded as a major route to solving the global water and sanitation crisis. But is it the key, and should innovation be all about miracle inventions? Rémi Kaupp, Urban Sanitation Specialist at WaterAid UK, discusses whether and where it might be useful.

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  • Can mobile technology revolutionise data use in the WASH sector?

    Mary walking carrying a bucket of water.
    Posted 28 Aug 2015 by Erik Harvey

    The proposed Sustainable Development Goal on water and sanitation is good news for global poverty – and presents a huge challenge. Erik Harvey, Head of Programme Support Unit at WaterAid, discusses the role mobile technologies such as mWater could have in ensuring we have the data we need to achieve it.

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