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Month in pictures
Water resource management: Burkina Faso

WaterAid, working with local partners, local government and communities in the village of Basbedo, have implemented multiple water resource management techniques to help ensure a sustainable water supply during periods of drought. These techniques include water level monitoring and analysis, pump maintenance and repair, and increasing community engagement so that any issues regarding conflicting water use can be resolved.

The success of the project has meant that the techniques used can be implemented in other communities facing similar issues, such as Nabitenga and Imbina, where we collected case studies about the situations people face when they don't have a regular clean water supply.

Bangre Alizeta and Bangre Alimanata help each other to collect dirty water from a partially dried river bed. Imbina, Burkina Faso, October 2014

Living with an irregular water supplyBurkina Faso

Bangre Alizeta and Bangre Alimanata help each other to collect dirty water from a partially dried river bed. Imbina, Burkina Faso, October 2014.
Bangre Lebende tends to his crops. He grows food to feed his family and sells any surplus but some years there is not enough rainfall and the crop fails.

Water vital for livelihoodsBurkina Faso

Bangre Lebende tends to his crops. He grows food to feed his family and sells any surplus but some years there is not enough rainfall and the crop fails. Imbina, Burkina Faso, October 2014.
Ouedroago Edmond, WASH focal point of the local government, and Bangre Komanga, Chief of Nabitenga, discuss the health of a local well.

Community engagementBurkina Faso

Ouedroago Edmond, WASH focal point of the local government, and Bangre Komanga, Chief of Nabitenga, discuss the health of a local well. A water association has been formed so that the village can protect their water resources. Nabitenga, Burkina Faso, October 2014.
Diallo Safiatou, with her new born twins. Diallo is struggling to carry out her daily tasks, like collecting water, now that she has two very young babies. T

Competing prioritiesBurkina Faso

Diallo Safiatou, with her new born twins. Diallo is struggling to carry out her daily tasks, like collecting water, now that she has two very young babies. There is a borehole in the community but it is still far from her home on an uneven path. She also no longer has the time or energy to prepare the food she used to sell in the community and so relies heavily on her husband’s farming. Nabitenga, Burkina Faso, October 2014.
Diao Hassane, President of the Water Users’ Association in Nabitenga,  locks a bore hole for the night.

Challenging conditionsBurkina Faso

Diao Hassane, President of the Water Users’ Association in Nabitenga, locks a bore hole for the night. “Before there were more rains. At the end of the dry season we still had water in some of the rivers. Now there is no water anywhere.” Nabitenga, Burkina Faso, October 2014.
Diallo Adana checks her peanut crop which has failed due to lack of rain.

Reliant on unreliable weatherBurkina Faso

Diallo Adana checks her peanut crop which has failed due to lack of rain. This year the rainy season was shorter than usual, just three more rains and the crop would have survived. Nabitenga, Burkina Faso, October 2014.
Lucien Damiba from WaterAid Burkina Faso attaches a water monitoring device that he has just remove from a borehole, to a latop.

Data leads to knowledgeBurkina Faso

Lucien Damiba from WaterAid Burkina Faso attaches a water monitoring device that he has just remove from a borehole, to a latop. WaterAid and our partner DAKUPA are working with the community to monitor water levels so that they are able to understand how to manage the water supply. The data will also be fed back to local and national government to inform policy making.
Villagers, headed by pump mechanic, Sogho Rasmane, fix a broken bore hole.

Local trainingBurkina Faso

Villagers, headed by pump mechanic, Sogho Rasmane, fix a broken bore hole. The village water committee has been given basic training in pump repair and maintenance, as Sogho says: “Anyone who has contact with the pump needs to have information about how it works so that they can look after it properly...in the past there were too many breakdowns because the government just came and put in the pump and the community would just come and use it.” Now the water supply can be sustained. Basbedo, Burkina Faso, October 2014.
Koudougou Aminata is the only woman carrying out water level monitoring in her community.

Empowering womenBurkina Faso

Koudougou Aminata is the only woman carrying out water level monitoring in her community. Here she proudly displays the graphs she had drawn up using data on monthly rainfall and groundwater levels which she had collected over the year. By monitoring this data, the community can ensure that water is used effectively in times of drought. Basbedo, Burkina Faso. October 2014.
Balima Karim creates a map of the local area with sticks, pieces of fruit and ash.

Optimistic and confident Burkina Faso

Balima Karim creates a map of the local area with sticks, pieces of fruit and ash. As a facilitator, Balima monitors water levels and rainfall. Having seen a number of changes in his village following the implementation of a water committee he is optimistic about the future: “I have hope for the future. I say this because I am conscious that sometimes there are water shortage issues, but I am also confident that we will always have enough water to drink this is sure, maybe we won’t have enough for our activities, but for the drinking we will have enough water.” Basbedo, Burkina Faso, October 2014.
Sedgaa Josephine gives her daughter Ratba a drink of water.

Aid effectivenessBurkina Faso

Sedgaa Josephine gives her daughter Ratba a drink of water. Now that Sedgaa’s village has a stable water supply she is able to earn a livelihood brewing beer. She uses the water to brew her beer and the money she makes from selling the beer at the market enables her to support her family. Basbedo, Burkina Faso, October 2014.
The adults in this village are working to monitor water levels and rainfall so that they can ensure a sustainable water supply for the next generation. Basbedo, Burkina Faso, October 2014

Sustainable futureBurkina Faso

The adults in this village are working to monitor water levels and rainfall so that they can ensure a sustainable water supply for the next generation. Basbedo, Burkina Faso, October 2014.