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Just £15 can provide one person with access to safe water.
(WASHCost and WaterAid, 2014)

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Lack of water, sanitation and hygiene costs Sub-Saharan African countries more in lost GDP than the entire continent gets in development aid.
(Using percentage estimate from UNDP: Human Development Report, 2006)

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In 2014/2015, we reached 2 million people with safe water and 3.1 million people with sanitation.
(Average figure, WaterAid 2015)

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Nearly half the people who gained access to water between 1990 and 2010 live in India and China.
(WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation 2012)

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One study estimates that funding for water and sanitation infrastructure is lacking by US$115 million a year in Sub-Saharan countries. (Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic (AICD) Study), while WHO gives a global estimate of $535 billion needed in new capital investment to reach universal access, or $26.75 billion per year between 2010 and 2030. (Hutton, WHO, 2012)

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Since 1981 we have reached 23 million people with safe water.
(WaterAid, 2015)

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Since 2004 we have reached 21 million people with sanitation.
(WaterAid, 2015)

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The average person in the UK uses 150 litres of water a day. In Australia it's around 500 litres and in the USA, over 570 litres.
(UNDP: Human Development Report, 2006: page 34)

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Water in Accra, Ghana, costs three times as much as in New York.
(UNDP, 2006)

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Women in Africa and Asia often carry water on their heads weighing 20kg, the same as the average UK airport luggage allowance
(UNDP: Human Development Report, 2006: page 34-35)