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WaterAid resources

Reducing inequalities

Reducing Inequalities in Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) 

This Rural Water Supply Network report synthesises members experiences and lessons learnt on Reducing Inequalities in WASH. Practical approaches to improve participation of everyone, inclusive infrastructure designs and information, guidance and support that exist on these are covered. Experiences on disability inclusion, gender equality, menstrual hygiene management, rights to water and sanitation and school WASH from West and East Africa, Central America, South and Southeast Asia are captured.

Taking stock

Taking stock: Incompetent at incontinence – why are we ignoring the needs of incontinence sufferers? 

Incontinence affects one in four women over the age of 35 years and one in ten adult men. So why don’t WASH practitioners systematically consider it in our work? Incompetent at incontinence – why are we ignoring the needs of incontinence sufferers? is a Waterlines article, written by WaterAid and others to raise awareness about the challenges incontinence suffers face and what we can do to help minimise these.

Review of equity and inclusion

Equity and inclusion review: phase one

WaterAid (WA) has been a leading mainstream organisation intentionally and practically investing to apply equity and inclusion principles in its work for more than six years. In July 2014 a two-phase review of equity and inclusion work started to assess the relevance and effectiveness of what has happened to date and make recommendations for improvements to future practice. This is the report of phase one, based on information from 29 documents, and interviews with 15 staff across WaterAid and one external person (at WEDC)

Review of equity and inclusion

Equity and inclusion review: phase two

WaterAid (WA) has been a leading mainstream organisation intentionally and practically investing to apply equity and inclusion principles in its work for more than six years. In July 2014 a two-phase review of equity and inclusion work started to assess the relevance and effectiveness of what has happened to date and make recommendations for improvements to future practice. This is the report of phase two. The review is based on visits to two Country Programmes (Mali in West Africa and Nepal in South Asia) plus skype interviews with eight staff in WA Bangladesh.

A review of the rights, equity and inclusion work of WaterAid Nepal, by Sue Coe and Jane WilburWaterAid Nepal: Equity and Inclusion Review

This review assesses the status of equity and inclusion approaches in WaterAid Nepal's work, including insights around monitoring and evaluation, participation and programming partnerships. Findings from this review fed into WaterAid’s global Equity and Inclusion review.

WaterAid Bangladesh Equity and Inclusion Review, report by Jane Wilbur and Chelsea Huggett, 2015WaterAid Bangladesh: Equity and Inclusion Review

This review assesses the relevance and effectiveness of the rights, equity and inclusion approaches of WaterAid Bangladesh, including key findings and recommendations. Findings from this review fed into WaterAid’s global Equity and Inclusion review.

Review of equity and inclusion

WaterAid Mali: equity and inclusion review

This review assesses the relevance and effectiveness of the rights, equity and inclusion approaches of WaterAid Mali, including key findings and recommendations. Findings from this review fed into WaterAid’s global Equity and Inclusion review.

A still from one of the Count me in filmsCount me in films – 'How to...' >

Epic Arts and WaterAid have produced some short, animated films to support the new national guidelines on making WASH inclusive in Cambodia, including how to do accessibility and safety audits, barrier analyses, collect data on disability and how WASH organisations can work in partnership with Disabled Persons Organisations.


A still of a Count me in film. Count me in films – parts 1-7 >

Count me in is a series of short and entertaining sketches which show how on-inclusive WASH impacts on the lives of people with disabilities. These raise awareness of the issues in a light hearted way. None of the sketches are more than a few minutes long.

A still from one of the Count me in filmsCount me in films – 'How to...' >

Epic Arts and WaterAid have produced some short, animated films to support the new national guidelines on making WASH inclusive in Cambodia, including how to do accessibility and safety audits, barrier analyses, collect data on disability and how WASH organisations can work in partnership with Disabled Persons Organisations.


A still of a Count me in film. Count me in films – parts 1-7 >

Count me in is a series of short and entertaining sketches which show how on-inclusive WASH impacts on the lives of people with disabilities. These raise awareness of the issues in a light hearted way. None of the sketches are more than a few minutes long.

Menstrual hygiene matters

Menstrual hygiene matters is an essential resource for improving menstrual hygiene for women and girls in lower and middle-income countries. Nine modules and toolkits cover key aspects of menstrual hygiene in different settings, including communities, schools and emergencies.

Equity and inclusion: play your part. Awareness raising training guideEquity and inclusion: play your part. Awareness raising training guide

The equity and inclusion framework provides a common platform for us all to build on. The purpose of awareness raising training is to come to a common understanding of equity and inclusion in water, sanitation and hygiene and to provide an opportunity to think about how this applies to your area of work, and how to take it forward.

Undoing inequity document screenshotUndoing Inequity

The Undoing Inequity research aims to understand and address the barriers that disabled, older and chronically ill people face when accessing water, sanitation and hygiene services in Zambia and Uganda.

Undoing inequity process review thumbnailUndoing inequity: process review

The purpose of this review was to examine the strengths and weaknesses of the emerging approach to inclusive WASH that has been developed in Uganda and Zambia, and to make recommendations for how this might be scaled up across WaterAid.

Publication front cover pageEquity and inclusion framework

WaterAid believes that access to safe water, improved hygiene and sanitation (WASH) is a human right. These essential services underpin human development and transform lives, enabling people to overcome poverty. WaterAid's entry point is one of anti-poverty. We believe that poverty, marginalisation, and social exclusion are inextricably linked.

Compedium-of-accessible-WASH-technologiesCompendium of accessible WASH technologies

This Compendium of accessible WASH technologies is designed for use by staff working directly with communities, such as health workers and community volunteers working with disabled and older people and their families in rural areas of Sub-Saharan Africa.

Women and WASH briefing noteWomen and WASH

A lack of access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) affects women disproportionally, due to both biological and cultural factors. In addition to meeting women’s specific practical needs, WASH is also essential for their social and economic development, contributing towards gender equality and the realisation of their rights.

Menstrual hygiene matters front coverMenstrual hygiene matters

An essential resource for improving menstrual hygiene for women and girls in lower and middle-income countries.

Violence Gender WASH ToolkitViolence, gender and WASH toolkit

This toolkit has been developed for use by WASH practitioners but will also be useful for gender-based violence, gender, protection, health and education specialists.

The toolkit provides examples of good practice approaches which have the potential to reduce vulnerabilities to violence. It was co-published by 27 organisations, including WaterAid, SHARE and WEDC.

WASH and HIV factsheetWASH and HIV factsheet

This factsheet sets out to explain the connection between water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and HIV and AIDS, and provides recommendations on how HIV interventions can integrate WASH into their programming.

Other resources

Achieving gender equality through WASH

Achieving gender equality through WASH

The Achieving gender equality through WASH briefing shows that equitable and universal access cannot be achieved without specific gender equality measures in water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) policy and programming to ensure that the rights of girls and women to water and sanitation are met.

Thumbnail of the book Sustainable Sanitation for All

Sustainable Sanitation for All: Experiences, Challenges and Innovations

This new book looks at the sustainability of Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) and sanitation with reference to the Sustainable Development Goals. With examples from Africa and Asia, the book captures a range of experiences and innovations from a broad range of institutions and actors within the WASH sector. It attempts to make recommendations and practical suggestions for policy and practice for practitioners, funders, policymakers and governments.