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The Lakes
Crikle Crags
There are a variety of routes directly to the summit: most people climb the fell from Great Langdale and usually together with all or some of the adjoining fells of Bowfell, Pike of Blisco, Rossett Pike and Cold Pike to make a high level ridge walk which encompasses the whole of the high ground at the head of Great Langdale.

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Dollywaggon Pike
The summit is a small grassy rise directly at the head of The Tongue. It carries a small cairn with a larger one a few yards to the west. The view is extensive with the eastern foreground particularly fine.

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Dove Crag
The fell is often climbed as part of the Fairfield horseshoe walk but a direct ascent from Patterdale is required to show the fell's full potential, displaying the impressive crags just to the north east of the summit.

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Grasmoor
Grasmoor is distinguished by its steep western flank, dropping dramatically to Crummock Water. The obvious way is direct up the screes from Lanthwaite on the Crummock Water road, picking through the rock scenery above to appear on Grasmoor End from the north west.

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Grisedale Pike
Standing over the small village of Braithwaite near to Keswick, Grisedale Pike has a distinctive profile. Its north east ridge climbs from the village in three steps.

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Haystacks
The route ascends via the Scarth Gap pass, A circular route can be made by returning via Warnscale Bottom, but this will be a little additional distance to the data above.

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Helm Crag
Despite its low height it sits prominently at the end of a ridge. This, combined with the distinctive summit rocks which provide the alternative name 'The Lion and the Lamb', makes Helm Crag one of the most recognised hills in the District.

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Helvellyn
The peak of Helvellyn is the highest on the north-south ridge situated between the Thirlmere valley to the west, and Patterdale to the east. The summit of Helvellyn takes the form of a broad plateau about 500 metres (1,640 ft) long.

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High Raise
High Raise is commonly regarded as the most central mountain in the district and this position gives a fine viewpoint to admire the surrounding mountains and beyond. All of England's 3,000 foot (914 m) mountains (Skiddaw, Helvellyn and the Scafells) can be well seen from the summit.

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High Street
High Street's eastern side is craggy and precipitous as it falls away towards Haweswater Reservoir. The best ascents of the fell can be undertaken from the east. The climb from Mardale is an exhilarating ridge walk with spectacular views down into Riggindale.

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Pike of Stickle
Pike of Stickle rises steeply from Langdale, culminating in a narrow tapering summit which gives excellent views of the head of the valley, the fells of Bow Fell and Crinkle Crags showing well. The fell is invariably climbed from Great Langdale with either the New or Old Dungeon Ghyll Hotels as the starting points.

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Pillar
Situated between the valleys of Ennerdale to the north and Wasdale to the south, it is the highest point of the Pillar group (some dozen fells clustered round it).

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Red Pike (Buttermere)
The direct ascent of Red Pike from Buttermere is very popular and the ridge walk from Red Pike to Haystacks is regarded as one of the finest in the area, with excellent views of the Scafells, Great Gable and Pillar.

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Scafell
Scafell is one of a horseshoe of high fells, open to the south, which surrounds the head of Eskdale, Cumbria. The ascent of the Pike is most often attempted from Wasdale Head.

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Scafell Pike
Scafell Pike is one of a horseshoe of high fells, open to the south, which surrounds the head of Eskdale, Cumbria. The ascent of the Pike is most often attempted from Wasdale Head.

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Skiddaw
It is the simplest of the Lake District mountains of this height to ascend (as there is a well-trodden tourist track from a car park to the north-east of Keswick, near the summit of Latrigg).

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Stony Cove Pike [Caudale Moor]
Stony Cove Pike is wide and sprawling, with six ridges leaving the summit area. The main summit sprouts four to the points of the compass. Eastward is the rocky descent to Threshwaite Mouth, followed by an equally steep climb to Thornthwaite Crag.

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Wetherlam
Wetherlam is the most northerly of the Coniston Fells, the range of fells to the north-west of Coniston village; its north-east slopes descend to Little Langdale.

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The Knott (High Street)
The Knott has a grassy summit with a small cairn and a ridgeline wall passes within a few yards. The view west is good with all of the 3,000 ft tops in sight. Ullswater can also be seen and Hayeswater and Brothers Water can be brought into view by moving a little to the south west

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