WaterAid Tartan Trail

When:
- Add to Calendar 2018-06-04 00:00:00 2018-06-10 00:00:00 WaterAid Tartan Trail The WaterAid Scotland Tartan Trail is a team-based walk, cycle or climb. Join hundreds of others whilst raising money to help make clean water, decent toilets and good hygiene become a normal part of life for people around the world. Location WaterAid UK [email protected] Europe/London public
Where:
Various routes across Scotland
Distance:
Routes vary in length and difficulty
Teams:
Minimum of 4, maximum of 7 per team
Registration fee:
No fee, but a Tartan Trail kit plus t-shirt is £15
Fundraising target:
To be confirmed
WaterAid Scotland Tartan Trail Header JPG WaterAid/Laura Hunter

Event information

The WaterAid Scotland Tartan Trail is a team-based walk, cycle or climb. Join hundreds of others whilst raising money to help make clean water, decent toilets and good hygiene become a normal part of life for people around the world.

The Tartan Trails take place across a selection of Scotland’s National Trails, cycle paths, coastal routes, canal paths, Munros and some smaller local walks and climbs. There really is something for everyone, whether you are looking to make it a fun family challenge or push yourself to the limits we’ve got you covered.

You can take a look at the different routes on offer on our Tartan Trail route list below. Once you've decided which route most takes your fancy, simply select that route, sort your team and sign up today!

Walks/ Circular routes

Dee Walk/ Tongland

Follow the tidal lower reaches of the River Dee, giving some fine opportunities for birdwatching. The walk starts in the picturesque town of Kirkcudbright and includes a loop to Tongland hydroelectric power station before beginning the return leg.

For more information about this route click here >

Lang Craigs

This circular route climbs from the streets of Dumbarton through the grounds of Overtoun House to climb up to a view point on Lang Craigs overlooking the Firth of Clyde before descending on a forestry track to pick up the cycle path running adjacent to the A82 and then back through the streets of Dumbarton.

For more information about this route click here >

Greenock Cut

A walk over moorland and then along the Greenock Cut - an aqueduct which is now a Designated Ancient Monument with fantastic views over the Clyde.

For more information about this route click here > 

Cumbrae

The Isle of Cumbrae is situated just off the Scottish mainland coast at the town of Largs.

For more information about this route click here >

Difficult climbs

Ben Nevis

At 1345 metres Ben Nevis is Scotland’s highest and most popular mountain. Thousands of people set off each year on the challenge to climb The Ben.

The total ascent for the climb is 1006m, and will take an estimated 5 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here >

Ben Lomond

Ben Lomond is one of the most popular Munros, rewarding the 30,000 people who make it to the top with fantastic views of the length of Loch Lomond and far into the hills to the north and the Trossachs to the east.

The total ascent for the climb is 1006m, and will take an estimated 5 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here >

Ben Vorlich

Ben Vorlich above Loch Earn is one of the best-known Scottish mountains and is very popular. Close to the Highland boundary, it gives excellent views into the Lowlands.

The total ascent for the climb is 1260m, and will take an estimated 5-6 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here >

Meall nan Tarmachan

Meall nan Tarmachan is the only Munro summit on the Tarmachan ridge. It can be climbed quickly from Lochain na Lairige but is usually enjoyed as part of a very enjoyable and rocky scramble along the whole ridge.

The total ascent for the climb is 783m, and will take an estimated 5-7 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here >

Ben Cruachan

Ben Cruachan is one of the finest Munros in the southern Highlands, its pointed peak towering above its rocky satellites giving great views.

The total ascent for the climb is 1367m, and will take an estimated 7-9 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here >

Ben Lawers

Ben Lawers is the highest mountain in the Southern Highlands and one of Scotland's most popular peaks. Rising high above Loch Tay, it is also renowned for its arctic-alpine flora, and is a National Nature Reserve. The mountain is owned by the National Trust for Scotland.

The total ascent for the climb is 1367m, and will take an estimated 7-9 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here >  

Ben Ledi

Ben Ledi is a familiar landmark from Callander and the highest mountain in the main part of the Trossachs. It is a very popular hillwalk and its position on the edge of the Highlands makes it an excellent viewpoint.

The total ascent for the climb is 760m, and will take an estimated 4-6 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here >

Ben Vrackie

Ben Vrackie is indelibly associated with the town of Pitlochry at its foot, and has for long been an extremely popular ascent for those visiting the town. The summit is a great viewpoint and the ascent follows good paths through woodland, open moorland and past picturesque Loch a' Choire.

The total ascent for the climb is 720m, and will take an estimated 3-4 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here >

Carn Mairg

Carn Mairg is the highest of a range of four Munros on the north side of Glen Lyon above Invervar. Alone amongst the four its summit has small crags and a distinctive form.

The total ascent for the climb is 1302m, and will take an estimated 7-8 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here > 

Beinn Eighe - Ruadh-stac Mor

Beinn Eighe is one of celebrated Torridon giants. Ruadh Stac-Mhor is its highest summit, a steep-sided dome off to the north of the main ridge, high above Coire Mhic Fhearchair, one of the finest corries in the country.

The total ascent for the climb is 1010m, and will take an estimated 7-9 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here >

An Teallach

This fabled mountain is perhaps the most impressive in Britain, and gives a day of drama and views that will live in the memory forever. The full traverse is a magnificent scramble, whilst the two Munros can be reached by an easier there-and-back route.

The total ascent for the climb is 1438m, and will take an estimated 7-11 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here >

Moderate Climbs

The Cobbler

The Cobbler, also known as Ben Arthur has the most distinctive outline of any mountain in the Southern Highlands and makes a fantastic short day out.

The total ascent for the climb is 1260m, and will take an estimated 4-6 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

Schiehallion

One of Scotland’s best known hills, Schiehallion is one of the easiest Munros to climb on a fine summer’s day. It takes the form of a broad ridge, with the famous conical appearance only apparent from across Loch Rannoch.

The total ascent for the climb is 455m, and will take an estimated 4-5.5 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up this route >

Easy Climbs

Arthur's Seat

Experience a proper hill walk in the heart of the city. Arthur's Seat's rocky summit towers over Edinburgh, with fabulous views in all directions, and the extensive parkland surrounding it is an oasis of calm as a retreat from the busy city.

The total ascent for the climb is 279m, and will take an estimated 2-2.5 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

The Whangie

The Whangie is a bizarre rock-feature in the Kilpatrick Hills, and has wonderful views towards Loch Lomond, the Highlands and the Campsies.

The total ascent for the climb is 180m, and will take an estimated 1.5-2 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

Meikle Bin

The steep but easy climb to the summit of Meikle Bin rewards with excellent views over the reservoir and surrounding fields. Popular with families, it is a good challenge for little legs.

The total ascent for the climb is 397m, and will take an estimated 2-3 hours to complete.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

Trails

Borders Abbeys Way

Borders Abbeys Way is a long distance walk that links all four Abbeys in a circular route of 107km. 

The route has five stages, varying in length from 17km to 29km.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

Fife Coastal Path

Linking the Forth and Tay Estuaries, the Fife Coastal path runs for over 183km through the varied landscapes of Fife.

This route has seven stages, varying in length from 5.75km to 29km. 

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

Formartine and Buchan Way

Opened in the early 1990s, the Formartine and Buchan Way runs along the former route of the railway that extended from Dyce on the fringes of Aberdeen north to Maud, where it split with branches heading to both Fraserburgh and Peterhead.

The route has eight stages, varying in length from 7km to 18km. Suitable for cycling.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

Forth & Clyde/Union Canal

Crossing the Scottish Lowlands at the narrowest part, the canal runs for 56km. 

The route has six stages, varying in length from 13km – 21km. Suitable for cycling.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

Great Glen Way

The Great Glen Way stretches for 117km from coast to coast across the Highlands, linking the main centres of Fort William and the regional capital of Inverness.

The route has nine stages, varying in length and difficulty from 17km – 29km.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

John Muir Way

This new long distance path stretches from coast to coast across Scotland, passing through the varied landscapes of the central belt.

The route has eleven stages, varying in length from 15km – 29km.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

Mull of Galloway Trail

The Mull of Galloway Trail stretches for 40km from the dramatic lighthouse at the southernmost point of Scotland to the town of Stranraer.

The route has three stages, each 20km in length.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

Rob Roy Way

The Rob Roy Way is a 128km walk linking Drymen (on the West Highland Way) with Pitlochry in Perthshire.

The route has ten stages, varying in length from 15km – 25km.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

St Cuthbert's Way

St Cuthbert's Way runs from Melrose Abbey in the Scottish Borders to the Holy Island of Lindisfarne off the coast of Northumberland in England.

The route has four stages, varying in length from 21km -29km.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

Speyside Way

Starting at Buckie on the Moray coastline, The Speyside Way follows the course of the mighty River Spey up to Aviemore and on to Kincraig in the Cairngorms. 

The route has eight stages, varying in length from 9km – 25km.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

West Highland Way

The West Highland Way was Scotland's first long distance route and remains by far the most popular. Stretching for 151km from Milngavie on the edge of Glasgow to Fort William at the foot of Ben Nevis, the route offers a fabulous introduction to the Scottish Highlands.

The route has eight stages, varying in length from 14km – 25km.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

West Island Way

The West Island Way is Scotland's first official island long distance footpath and was opened in 2000 to celebrate the turn of the millennium.

The route has four stages, varying in length from 8km – 19km.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

South Loch Ness Trail

Running for almost 50km from remote Loch Tarff to the outskirts of the Highland capital, Inverness, The South Loch Ness Trail explores the varied landscapes on the quieter side of Scotland's most famous loch.

The route has three stages, varying in length from 11km – 22km.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

River Annan Trail (Annandale Way)

The Annandale Way is a new route that runs from the top of the valley at Annandale Head in the hills north of the town of Moffat to the mouth of the River Annan and the Solway Firth.

The route has seven stages varying in length from 12.5km to 22.5km.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

Berwickshire Coastal Path

Stretching for some 48km from Cockburnspath in the north down to the English Border and Berwick-upon-Tweed, the Berwickshire Coastal Path provides some superb walking. The northern end of the route links up with the Southern Upland Way, whilst the John Muir Way which continues round the coastline of East Lothian is accessible via the John Muir link.

The route has four stages varying in length from 4km to 19km.

For more information about this route click here >

Sign up to this route >

Stay in touch

Looking to sign up for the event? Or need help choosing your route?
Contact the Scotland and Northern Ireland team and we'll be happy to help you.

Email us: [email protected]
Call us:
0141 414 7267