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WaterAid can

WaterAid can

We’re making sure people have water they can rely on, even in an unreliable climate.  

Rising temperatures.
Flash floods.
Landslides.
Drought.

It’s a perfect storm fed by climate change.

Two white hands hold a mobile phone. An image of women in saris walking through floodwater is on screen.

While we can’t stop the storm from coming, WaterAid can make sure that everyone, everywhere has the water they need, whatever the weather.

Two white hands hold a mobile phone depicting cracked earth caused by drought on screen.

How do we do it?

Two white hands hold a mobile phone depicting cracked earth caused by drought on screen.

We work with people

We work with the communities left furthest behind to build water supplies that keep pumping, come rain or shine. We’ve been doing this for 40 years, working with industry partners and side-by-side with people in countries that are among the worst affected by climate change.

A group of Nepali wworkers dig a trench for pipework. One of them is holding a circle of pipe in one hand.

Man Bahadur Thami, 46 (pictured crouching) leads community members as they dig a trench to lay pipework for a new water system in Kalinchowk, Dolakha, Nepal, 2020. Dolakha in northeastern Nepal is especially vulnerable to landslides and drought caused by climate change. Image: WaterAid/ Mani Karmacharya

Man Bahadur Thami, 46 (pictured crouching) leads community members as they dig a trench to lay pipework for a new water system in Kalinchowk, Dolakha, Nepal, 2020. Dolakha in northeastern Nepal is especially vulnerable to landslides and drought caused by climate change. Image: WaterAid/ Mani Karmacharya

An official in Ethiopia inspects a water tower. He holds a trapdoor open with his right hand and looks over his shoulder at the camera.

Leyew Animut inspects the water tower in Finote Selam, Ethiopia, February 2020. Image: WaterAid/ Joey Lawrence

An official in Ethiopia inspects a water tower. He holds a trapdoor open with his left hand as he crouches by the opening and peers inside.

Image: WaterAid/ Joey Lawrence

An official in Ethiopia is poised to sip from a glass of water.

Leyew sips water that has come from an underground pipe system at a coffee shop in Finote Selam, Ethiopia, February 2020. Image: WaterAid/ Joey Lawrence

An official in Ethiopia sips from a glass of water.

Image: WaterAid/ Joey Lawrence

An official in Ethiopia inspects a water tower. He holds a trapdoor open with his right hand and looks over his shoulder at the camera.

Leyew Animut inspects the water tower in Finote Selam, Ethiopia, February 2020. Image: WaterAid/ Joey Lawrence

An official in Ethiopia inspects a water tower. He holds a trapdoor open with his left hand as he crouches by the opening and peers inside.

Image: WaterAid/ Joey Lawrence

An official in Ethiopia is poised to sip from a glass of water.

Leyew sips water that has come from an underground pipe system at a coffee shop in Finote Selam, Ethiopia, February 2020. Image: WaterAid/ Joey Lawrence

An official in Ethiopia sips from a glass of water.

Image: WaterAid/ Joey Lawrence

Leyew Animut is one of many local experts we work with to get clean water to people. A manager at a water services company in Ethiopia, he says:

"Even though climate change has a huge effect nationally, we have witnessed its direct effect on our Institution’s work. Unless we have rain, the water from the spring gets lower. This forces people to queue for water.

"Since the effect of climate change is very dangerous, I think we all need to give more attention to it and work towards preventing it.

"When people have water, they can keep their hygiene properly. Previously people used to travel to far places to fetch water but now because of our institution many households have tap water in their compounds."

An older lady with a cross expression holds a red umbrella and pushes a cart towards two middle-aged people in a nondescript British town.

We enable people to share knowledge

We pool knowledge and share expertise so that communities can learn from each other. Right now, people young and old around the world are championing the right to water, demanding better investment in sustainable water solutions from their governments, and calling the world’s attention to the impact that climate change is having on their access to clean water.

A young Zambian DJ sits in front of a microphone wearing headphones. She wears a checked pink and blue collared shirt.

Climate change ambassador and youth reporter Beatrice Caroline Phiri in action in Lusaka, Zambia. She's spent the past five years presenting a weekly radio show on the importance of the environment and the impact of climate change, 2020. Image: WaterAid/ Chileshe Chanda

Climate change ambassador and youth reporter Beatrice Caroline Phiri in action in Lusaka, Zambia. She's spent the past five years presenting a weekly radio show on the importance of the environment and the impact of climate change, 2020. Image: WaterAid/ Chileshe Chanda

A Bangladeshi woman in a red, black and yellow sari stands next to her husband who is wearing a checked shirt and blue trousers.

WaterAid/ DRIK/ Habibul Haque

A Bangladeshi woman wearing a red, yellow and black sari uses a handheld broom to sweep the steps of her raised toilet.

WaterAid/ DRIK/ Habibul Haque

A Bangladeshi woman wearing a red, yellow and black sari crouches by a black water tank, as she holds an aluminium jug to its tap. She smiles at the camera.

WaterAid/ DRIK/ Habibul Haque

A Bangladeshi woman in a red, black and yellow sari stands next to her husband who is wearing a checked shirt and blue trousers.

WaterAid/ DRIK/ Habibul Haque

A Bangladeshi woman wearing a red, yellow and black sari uses a handheld broom to sweep the steps of her raised toilet.

WaterAid/ DRIK/ Habibul Haque

A Bangladeshi woman wearing a red, yellow and black sari crouches by a black water tank, as she holds an aluminium jug to its tap. She smiles at the camera.

WaterAid/ DRIK/ Habibul Haque

Anita Das, 40, lives with her husband and four children in Trimohoni village, Khulna, southwestern Bangladesh. The area is prone to flooding, and the country itself is one of the worst affected by climate change.

“Earlier we had a makeshift latrine by the lake,” says Anita. “Most of the time it used to overflow and anyone walking could smell the rancid smell of human waste.”

In 2018, we worked with local partners Rupantar to build a raised, flood-resistant toilet as part of a project in Anita’s village.

“When we started using the toilet built by WaterAid and Rupantar, I noticed a significant change in my health and my family's as well,” she says. “We used to suffer from diarrhoea and stomach upsets almost every month but after the toilet was built, stomach upsets have become a rare case for my family.”

A white woman wearing a sunhat, red bathing suit and blue skirt sleeps on her fold-out chair, her chin tipped up to the sky. Her husband sits next to her while their son builds a sandcastle at their feet.

We use technology

Technology is the best defence against the uncertainty that climate change brings. Through industry partnerships, both national and international, we empower communities with water technologies that can be easily adapted to their context.

These technologies include:

  • building raised taps and toilets that can withstand floods
  • drilling boreholes to get to water deep underground
  • installing robust pipe networks
  • creating reservoir tanks in hilly areas that feed water to communities downhill
  • building ATMs that dispense water much like a cash ATM would
  • using energy from solar panels to pump water from underground

From composting loos to water ATMs, WaterAid technology has it covered. Check out our playlist on YouTube.

Two brown hands cup a senor in their palms. The hands are working hands - encrusted with dust and dirt.

Sensors powered by AI technology produced by Similie, are installed in the water storage tank in this village in Timor-Leste. WaterAid/ Vlad Sokhin

A woman in Burkina Faso wears a white headscarf and bright yellow blouse and skirt with black blockprint. She holds a pen and paper in her hands as she inspects a white rain gauge.
A woman in Burkina Faso wears a white headscarf and bright yellow blouse and skirt with black blockprint. She holds a pen and paper in her hands as she inspects a white rain gauge.

Justine Sawadogo, 30, reads and records data from a rain gauge installed in Bonam village, Burkina Faso, July 2021. As part of a project supported by the European Union and players of the People's Postcode Lottery, we provide training to Justine and others so they can manage their water resources locally. Image: WaterAid/ Basile Ouedraogo

A woman in Burkina Faso wears a white headscarf and bright yellow blouse and skirt with black blockprint. In her left hand is a pickaxe, which is resting on her shoulder as she looks up at the sky. She stands in the midst of an arid field.

Justine stands with her pickaxe, eyes turned to the sky, her millet field dry from days without rain, Bonam village, Burkina Faso, 2021. Image: WaterAid/ Basile Ouedraogo

Two brown hands cup a senor in their palms. The hands are working hands - encrusted with dust and dirt.

Sensors powered by AI technology produced by Similie, are installed in the water storage tank in this village in Timor-Leste. WaterAid/ Vlad Sokhin

A woman in Burkina Faso wears a white headscarf and bright yellow blouse and skirt with black blockprint. She holds a pen and paper in her hands as she inspects a white rain gauge.
A woman in Burkina Faso wears a white headscarf and bright yellow blouse and skirt with black blockprint. She holds a pen and paper in her hands as she inspects a white rain gauge.

Justine Sawadogo, 30, reads and records data from a rain gauge installed in Bonam village, Burkina Faso, July 2021. As part of a project supported by the European Union and players of the People's Postcode Lottery, we provide training to Justine and others so they can manage their water resources locally. Image: WaterAid/ Basile Ouedraogo

A woman in Burkina Faso wears a white headscarf and bright yellow blouse and skirt with black blockprint. In her left hand is a pickaxe, which is resting on her shoulder as she looks up at the sky. She stands in the midst of an arid field.

Justine stands with her pickaxe, eyes turned to the sky, her millet field dry from days without rain, Bonam village, Burkina Faso, 2021. Image: WaterAid/ Basile Ouedraogo

We provided training for 30-year-old farmer, Justine Sawadogo. Now, she regularly monitors this rain gauge installed in Bonam village, Burkina Faso.

"I had heard about this rain gauge technology before but I had never seen it and I didn't know how it worked," she says.

"But I think that by installing this here it will help us monitor, measure the amount of rain and the amount of water that falls per rain in the village. It will help us to better understand the rainfall in our community and to be able to draw lessons for our activities and water management."

With the right technology and tools, communities can better prepare themselves against extreme and unreliable weather.

A parched lake or river bed with trees in the distance.

Image: WaterAid/DRIK/Suman Paul

A parched lake or river bed with trees in the distance.

Image: WaterAid/DRIK/Suman Paul

Watch our film

No, we can't stop climate change

but...



By working with people, empowering communities to share knowledge, and using effective water technologies, we're making sure people can weather the uncertainty of our changing climate. 
 
 

Men in Africa are lined up across from each other with hoes to dig a trench.

We can help people live through climate change – today, tomorrow, and long into the future.

An black woman sits on a London bus, arm around her Asian girlfriend.