Getting your period. It’s one of the most normal things in the world.

What shouldn’t be normal is having to manage your period without clean water, a decent toilet or good hygiene. Yet that’s what millions of girls and women are forced to do every single month.

And the price they’re paying couldn’t be greater. Around the world:

miss class on their period and go on to drop out of school.

(UNESCO, 2014)

Only have a private place to change sanitary towels at school.

(UNICEF, 2013)

More than will drop out of school when they reach puberty.

(Plan India, 2015)

When your period is considered a curse

In parts of rural Nepal, communities still practice chhaupadi – exiling girls and women to huts or sheds during their period because they’re seen as unclean.

We’re determined to change normal for girls and women when they have their period, for good.

That’s why, with your help, we’re working with our partners around the world to ensure communities have the clean water, decent toilets and good hygiene they need to safeguard their health and their dignity.

It starts with these essentials. But it leads to girls being able to stay healthy and stay in school, giving them the chance to finish their education, get a job and break the cycle of poverty their families may have been trapped in for generations.

“Most of the girls are poor, so we came up with the initiative of "

In Zambia, Alice’s school now has clean water, decent toilets and sewing machines, so students can make reusable sanitary pads for themselves and their classmates.

Alice teaches school girls about sanitary pads in Zambia. WaterAid/Chileshe Chanda

"Before, no girls would graduate. Now from high school."

In India, Luvkush began educating the boys and men in his village about menstrual health, challenging the idea girls and women were unclean during their periods.

Luvkush, a school group leader in Uttar Pradesh, India. WaterAid/Poulomi Basu

"I can’t afford to miss class anymore. of becoming a pilot.”

In Uganda, Rachael, left, and Florence don’t have to worry about missing classes when they have their period, now they have clean water and new toilets at school.

Friends Racheal and Florence hold sanitary pads in their classroom in Uganda. WaterAid/James Kiyimba

Ready to make a difference? Just £2 a month can help change someone's life.

Get involved, your way

Join an event, fundraise with friends or find your own way to transform lives.

Give an unforgettable gift

We've got the perfect presents for every occasion in our Shop for Life.