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WaterAid challenges students to solve water issues in launch of 3D online game WaterQuest

 

26 Jan 2017

International development charity WaterAid has launched a new online educational game that challenges secondary school pupils to devise water and sanitation solutions in a rural village in Madagascar.

‘WaterQuest’ is aimed at encouraging Key Stage 3 and 4 pupils aged 11-16 to become global citizens as well as gain key skills.

The innovative 3D game is set in Ambohimahatsinjo in rural Madagascar, where people have faced many hardships due to a lack of access to clean water and toilets. Students can talk to three villagers and help WaterAid decide what solutions to implement to help transform lives.

The game is particularly relevant for Geography lessons, but addresses key skills including communication, literacy, problem-solving and decision-making in the quest to solve the village’s water problems.

Maria Georgiou, Education Specialist at WaterAid, said the charity also hoped children would gain confidence from taking decisions as well as learn empathy for others round the world. Maria said:

“WaterAid’s engaging and interactive game provides insight into the water and sanitation crisis while also showing students how they can make a difference as global citizens. Often when children see global problems on the news, they can feel helpless and far-removed, but WaterQuest is a fun way of showing that everyone really can bring about a positive change in the world. We hope that children will feel inspired to do more to help get clean water and toilets to everyone everywhere.”

As students explore the village and the different water and sanitation issues facing the villagers, the game has options to gain further information about the available solutions as well as see quotes and photos of people for the project.

Once their project has been completed, players are able to put together a report with all that has been learned and achieved. Players are able to present their solutions to WaterAid, while considering that funds may be limited.

The game then fast forwards a few months, and players will be able to see how the village has changed as a result of their decisions.

The game is based on the real stories of Solo and Ze and their families, who gained access to these life-saving resources through WaterAid’s work.

Following the popularity of online charity educational games for schools, WaterAid will also release two more games this spring – Angry Turds and a Minecraft game.

WaterQuest has been developed by Milo Creative and is the charity’s fourth game. The game has received positive feedback following its release and it is available for download here: www.wateraidgames.org.

Ends

For more information or to arrange interviews please contact: Suzy Vickers, PR Manager, at [email protected] or 0207 793 4995, or Laura Crowley, Senior Media Officer, at [email protected] or 020 7793 4965.

Or call our after-hours press line on +44 (0)7887 521 552 or email [email protected].

WaterAid

WaterAid’s vision is of a world where everyone has access to safe water and sanitation.  The international organisation works in 37 countries across Africa, Asia, Central America and the Pacific Region to transform lives by improving access to safe water, hygiene and sanitation in some of the world’s poorest communities.  Since 1981, WaterAid has reached 23 million people with safe water and, since 2004, 21 million people with sanitation.  For more information, visit www.wateraid.org, follow @WaterAidUK on Twitter, or visit us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/wateraid.

  • Around 315,000 children die each year from diarrhoeal diseases caused by dirty water and poor sanitation. That’s almost 900 children each day, or one child every two minutes.
  • Over 650 million people (around one in ten) are without safe water
  • Over 2.3 billion people (around one in three) live without improved sanitation
  • For every £1 invested in water and sanitation, an average of £4 is returned in increased productivity.
  • Just £15 can help provide one person with access to safe water.
  • For details on how individual countries are keeping their promises on water and sanitation, please see our online database, WASHWatch.org