Skip to main content
For the Brave - the Crypto Donation Water #WAGMI Fund | WaterAid

The Water Crypto Fund - Water #WAGMI | WaterAid

BRAVE BROWSER LOGO - LION!

Are you Brave enough for #WAGMI?

Without clean water, we're not all going to make it. We need the Brave - can you help?

The need for water is universal. We need it to drink, clean and wash. We need it to live. This is something we all agree on.

And yet, 2 billion people worldwide still don't have a reliable source of clean water. (1)

We want to change this because we need to change this.

Introducing the Water #WAGMI Crypto Fund
The Water #WAGMI crypto fund is an agile fund to support emergency response and project funding gaps around the world.

Our goal is to raise $1,000,000 to equip 50,000 people with clean water in the next twelve months. We need you to make it happen.

The Brave Donate Crypto

All crypto donations up to $50,000 will be matched by The Giving Block.

Progress So Far

The crypto community are this generation's changemakers for social good. You are solving the world's hardest problems and you can solve this one.

So far, the crypto community has raised $371,000 USD - that's clean water for 18,550 people! (It costs an average of $20 to equip one person with clean water).

With your input, we can leave scenes like this in the past.

Where they belong.

Watch the video below to see how life has changed for Nancy now that her community has clean water.

Water Unlocks Everything

Beyond basic hydration and hygiene, water underpins growth. Clean water opens doors to prosperity, education and advancement for the entire community.

Beyond the Tap

We know that water changes everything for a community. Check out our deep dive below, where we’ll walk you through one of our projects to show how life changes, beyond the tap.

Water is just the beginning

A water point close to home makes the job of water collection much quicker and safer.

Water is pumped in via underground pipes and is securely stored. This ensures a clean, reliable supply of water.

Clean water close to home means children can attend school and unlock the opportunities that an education provides.

Handwashing is one the best and cheapest ways to stop the spread of disease.

What you don't see in the photographs are all the invisible benefits of clean water. From education and opportunity to improved health, more economic vitality within the community and greater economic independence.

There are over 28 million stories we could tell...

These are just a few of them

“My name is Saleha. I run a committee of a women's group and I'm in charge of the management of the water plant. After getting involved, I started to earn [income], which empowered me both socially and financially. Now, I have social status. I feel proud of this because local political leaders also know me. Before, I would spend most of the day collecting drinking water. The water plant has given relief to the entire village from this challenge of collecting drinking water. Now I can spend money for the education of my children. " -- Saleha, Bangladesh. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Drik/Farzanna Hosen J

“My name is Saleha. I run a committee of a women's group and I'm in charge of the management of the water plant. After getting involved, I started to earn [income], which empowered me both socially and financially. Now, I have social status. I feel proud of this because local political leaders also know me. Before, I would spend most of the day collecting drinking water. The water plant has given relief to the entire village from this challenge of collecting drinking water. Now I can spend money for the education of my children. " -- Saleha, Bangladesh. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Drik/Farzanna Hosen J

"Growing food crops in our back yard garden has enabled us to save money which we would be spending on buying vegetables,” -- Batuuka. Photo Credit: WaterAid/James Kiyimba. “

"Growing food crops in our back yard garden has enabled us to save money which we would be spending on buying vegetables,” -- Batuuka. Photo Credit: WaterAid/James Kiyimba. “

"Now that we have a water kiosk in our community, everything is much better. We are free to play with our friends the whole afternoon. I am making more friends now than before. I am happy" -- Malita, Malawi. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Mia Shah

"Now that we have a water kiosk in our community, everything is much better. We are free to play with our friends the whole afternoon. I am making more friends now than before. I am happy" -- Malita, Malawi. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Mia Shah

"We are cleaner now and we no longer walk far away to fetch water." -- Ialisoa, Madagascar. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Ernest Randriarimalala

"We are cleaner now and we no longer walk far away to fetch water." -- Ialisoa, Madagascar. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Ernest Randriarimalala

Parul stands near her rainwater tank at home. WaterAid helps communities in coastal Bangladesh build rainwater harvesting systems to ensure they have a water supply that lasts through the dry season. Photo Credit:WaterAid/DRIK/Habibul Haque

Parul stands near her rainwater tank at home. WaterAid helps communities in coastal Bangladesh build rainwater harvesting systems to ensure they have a water supply that lasts through the dry season. Photo Credit:WaterAid/DRIK/Habibul Haque

"I feel so happy and independent that I can collect water at my own which was once a dream for me. I am a shopkeeper at my village. People used to travel around 6.5 Kms to fetch water" -- Muhammad, Pakistan. Photo Credit: WaterAid/ DRIK/ Habibul Haque

"I feel so happy and independent that I can collect water at my own which was once a dream for me. I am a shopkeeper at my village. People used to travel around 6.5 Kms to fetch water" -- Muhammad, Pakistan. Photo Credit: WaterAid/ DRIK/ Habibul Haque

"It’s really good that we now have the water taps. We were very happy when they arrived. We celebrated, singing and dancing and prepared special food. We used to collect water from the spring by the river, which was very far away; it took about 30 minutes to walk there and back, plus up to an hour waiting for your turn. I had to start collecting water very early in the morning; it was very tiring. It meant I couldn’t do other chores and that I was often late for school. Being late for school affected my studies as I would often miss the first class and it was hard to catch up." -- Tsehaynesh, Ethiopia. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Joey Lawrence

"It’s really good that we now have the water taps. We were very happy when they arrived. We celebrated, singing and dancing and prepared special food. We used to collect water from the spring by the river, which was very far away; it took about 30 minutes to walk there and back, plus up to an hour waiting for your turn. I had to start collecting water very early in the morning; it was very tiring. It meant I couldn’t do other chores and that I was often late for school. Being late for school affected my studies as I would often miss the first class and it was hard to catch up." -- Tsehaynesh, Ethiopia. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Joey Lawrence

"I think that when a woman joins this group she feels empowered. The empowerment of women in this village is very important because you are independent and could do many things for yourself." Roda of the soap and shea butter making group Kanuya, in the, Segou Region of Mali. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Guilhem Alandry

"I think that when a woman joins this group she feels empowered. The empowerment of women in this village is very important because you are independent and could do many things for yourself." Roda of the soap and shea butter making group Kanuya, in the, Segou Region of Mali. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Guilhem Alandry

“The water we have now is thanks to God, because we no longer have runny stomachs which we used to have from drinking dirty water. Thanks to God for having clean water in [our community]. I did help in the construction of the well, by mobilising the women in bringing local materials like stones and sand. And I also helped by preparing food for those who came to construct the well. The difference this (water) has got is that, one: runny stomachs are going to be reduced drastically. Secondly, children will no longer go into the bush to collect water as prior to this time they used to go there and sometimes they were confronted by snakes and other dangerous animals. This will be the difference, they will no longer go to the bush, thanks to God for that. Matu, at her community water pump in Sierra Leone. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Nana Kohi Acquah

“The water we have now is thanks to God, because we no longer have runny stomachs which we used to have from drinking dirty water. Thanks to God for having clean water in [our community]. I did help in the construction of the well, by mobilising the women in bringing local materials like stones and sand. And I also helped by preparing food for those who came to construct the well. The difference this (water) has got is that, one: runny stomachs are going to be reduced drastically. Secondly, children will no longer go into the bush to collect water as prior to this time they used to go there and sometimes they were confronted by snakes and other dangerous animals. This will be the difference, they will no longer go to the bush, thanks to God for that. Matu, at her community water pump in Sierra Leone. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Nana Kohi Acquah

"Water is a gift for us. We buy water and we can wash clothes here. Now when we have water we use it for drinking and the garden. At home we can wash clothes every day and before we didn't wash things so often. Water is closer and easier to reach now. I have noticed a big difference in health and the cleanliness of children and people in general. Children were very dirty before and their faces were always unclean. As I'm a pastor it helps to teach children to be clean not only for the spirit but for the body too." Pastor Nanolas holds his one year old daughter outside his church in a village in Madagascar. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Sam James

"Water is a gift for us. We buy water and we can wash clothes here. Now when we have water we use it for drinking and the garden. At home we can wash clothes every day and before we didn't wash things so often. Water is closer and easier to reach now. I have noticed a big difference in health and the cleanliness of children and people in general. Children were very dirty before and their faces were always unclean. As I'm a pastor it helps to teach children to be clean not only for the spirit but for the body too." Pastor Nanolas holds his one year old daughter outside his church in a village in Madagascar. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Sam James

Item 1 of 11

“My name is Saleha. I run a committee of a women's group and I'm in charge of the management of the water plant. After getting involved, I started to earn [income], which empowered me both socially and financially. Now, I have social status. I feel proud of this because local political leaders also know me. Before, I would spend most of the day collecting drinking water. The water plant has given relief to the entire village from this challenge of collecting drinking water. Now I can spend money for the education of my children. " -- Saleha, Bangladesh. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Drik/Farzanna Hosen J

“My name is Saleha. I run a committee of a women's group and I'm in charge of the management of the water plant. After getting involved, I started to earn [income], which empowered me both socially and financially. Now, I have social status. I feel proud of this because local political leaders also know me. Before, I would spend most of the day collecting drinking water. The water plant has given relief to the entire village from this challenge of collecting drinking water. Now I can spend money for the education of my children. " -- Saleha, Bangladesh. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Drik/Farzanna Hosen J

"Growing food crops in our back yard garden has enabled us to save money which we would be spending on buying vegetables,” -- Batuuka. Photo Credit: WaterAid/James Kiyimba. “

"Growing food crops in our back yard garden has enabled us to save money which we would be spending on buying vegetables,” -- Batuuka. Photo Credit: WaterAid/James Kiyimba. “

"Now that we have a water kiosk in our community, everything is much better. We are free to play with our friends the whole afternoon. I am making more friends now than before. I am happy" -- Malita, Malawi. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Mia Shah

"Now that we have a water kiosk in our community, everything is much better. We are free to play with our friends the whole afternoon. I am making more friends now than before. I am happy" -- Malita, Malawi. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Mia Shah

"We are cleaner now and we no longer walk far away to fetch water." -- Ialisoa, Madagascar. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Ernest Randriarimalala

"We are cleaner now and we no longer walk far away to fetch water." -- Ialisoa, Madagascar. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Ernest Randriarimalala

Parul stands near her rainwater tank at home. WaterAid helps communities in coastal Bangladesh build rainwater harvesting systems to ensure they have a water supply that lasts through the dry season. Photo Credit:WaterAid/DRIK/Habibul Haque

Parul stands near her rainwater tank at home. WaterAid helps communities in coastal Bangladesh build rainwater harvesting systems to ensure they have a water supply that lasts through the dry season. Photo Credit:WaterAid/DRIK/Habibul Haque

"I feel so happy and independent that I can collect water at my own which was once a dream for me. I am a shopkeeper at my village. People used to travel around 6.5 Kms to fetch water" -- Muhammad, Pakistan. Photo Credit: WaterAid/ DRIK/ Habibul Haque

"I feel so happy and independent that I can collect water at my own which was once a dream for me. I am a shopkeeper at my village. People used to travel around 6.5 Kms to fetch water" -- Muhammad, Pakistan. Photo Credit: WaterAid/ DRIK/ Habibul Haque

"It’s really good that we now have the water taps. We were very happy when they arrived. We celebrated, singing and dancing and prepared special food. We used to collect water from the spring by the river, which was very far away; it took about 30 minutes to walk there and back, plus up to an hour waiting for your turn. I had to start collecting water very early in the morning; it was very tiring. It meant I couldn’t do other chores and that I was often late for school. Being late for school affected my studies as I would often miss the first class and it was hard to catch up." -- Tsehaynesh, Ethiopia. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Joey Lawrence

"It’s really good that we now have the water taps. We were very happy when they arrived. We celebrated, singing and dancing and prepared special food. We used to collect water from the spring by the river, which was very far away; it took about 30 minutes to walk there and back, plus up to an hour waiting for your turn. I had to start collecting water very early in the morning; it was very tiring. It meant I couldn’t do other chores and that I was often late for school. Being late for school affected my studies as I would often miss the first class and it was hard to catch up." -- Tsehaynesh, Ethiopia. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Joey Lawrence

"I think that when a woman joins this group she feels empowered. The empowerment of women in this village is very important because you are independent and could do many things for yourself." Roda of the soap and shea butter making group Kanuya, in the, Segou Region of Mali. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Guilhem Alandry

"I think that when a woman joins this group she feels empowered. The empowerment of women in this village is very important because you are independent and could do many things for yourself." Roda of the soap and shea butter making group Kanuya, in the, Segou Region of Mali. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Guilhem Alandry

“The water we have now is thanks to God, because we no longer have runny stomachs which we used to have from drinking dirty water. Thanks to God for having clean water in [our community]. I did help in the construction of the well, by mobilising the women in bringing local materials like stones and sand. And I also helped by preparing food for those who came to construct the well. The difference this (water) has got is that, one: runny stomachs are going to be reduced drastically. Secondly, children will no longer go into the bush to collect water as prior to this time they used to go there and sometimes they were confronted by snakes and other dangerous animals. This will be the difference, they will no longer go to the bush, thanks to God for that. Matu, at her community water pump in Sierra Leone. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Nana Kohi Acquah

“The water we have now is thanks to God, because we no longer have runny stomachs which we used to have from drinking dirty water. Thanks to God for having clean water in [our community]. I did help in the construction of the well, by mobilising the women in bringing local materials like stones and sand. And I also helped by preparing food for those who came to construct the well. The difference this (water) has got is that, one: runny stomachs are going to be reduced drastically. Secondly, children will no longer go into the bush to collect water as prior to this time they used to go there and sometimes they were confronted by snakes and other dangerous animals. This will be the difference, they will no longer go to the bush, thanks to God for that. Matu, at her community water pump in Sierra Leone. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Nana Kohi Acquah

"Water is a gift for us. We buy water and we can wash clothes here. Now when we have water we use it for drinking and the garden. At home we can wash clothes every day and before we didn't wash things so often. Water is closer and easier to reach now. I have noticed a big difference in health and the cleanliness of children and people in general. Children were very dirty before and their faces were always unclean. As I'm a pastor it helps to teach children to be clean not only for the spirit but for the body too." Pastor Nanolas holds his one year old daughter outside his church in a village in Madagascar. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Sam James

"Water is a gift for us. We buy water and we can wash clothes here. Now when we have water we use it for drinking and the garden. At home we can wash clothes every day and before we didn't wash things so often. Water is closer and easier to reach now. I have noticed a big difference in health and the cleanliness of children and people in general. Children were very dirty before and their faces were always unclean. As I'm a pastor it helps to teach children to be clean not only for the spirit but for the body too." Pastor Nanolas holds his one year old daughter outside his church in a village in Madagascar. Photo Credit: WaterAid/Sam James

Why WaterAid?

We were founded in 1981 and work in over 30 countries. So far we have reached:

  • 28.5 million people with clean water
  • 29 million people with decent toilets
  • 27.8 million people with hygiene education

    We won't stop until everyone, everywhere has a reliable source of clean water.

How We Work

1. Build

Our local staff build clean water infrastructure, composting toilets and handwashing stations using local materials.

2. Teach

Community-led hygiene clubs use culturally relevant activities to teach adults and children good hygiene.

3. Monitor

Our staff train community members to monitor and maintain projects so the services work for the long-term.

Your support now can save lives tomorrow. Donate now.